DevOps Has Reached “Escape Velocity”, CIO’s Need To Get Onboard!

Robert Stroud

In an era where velocity and agility are driving technology management organizations over simple cost reduction, every business must constantly evolve to drive business differentiation. Leveraging practices such as Lean and Agile, smaller changes, automated pipelines and product centric teams, DevOps is transitioning from unicorns and small projects to company-wide initiatives. Companies such as WalmartING and JetBlue to name a few are leveraging DevOps to drive their business transformations and are reaping the benefits or accelerated velocity across the organization. DevOps is a powerful approach available to the CIO to drive velocity and agility, supporting the innovation required to drive business transformation.

 

Unlocking the value requires cultural change

To unlock the promise of DevOps, CIOs must lead and support a cultural change within their technology management organization. As any leader knows, changing institutionalized behavior is the toughest of all management challenges and CIOs are understandably skeptical of new trends.  Despite this, CIOs must recognize when a trend becomes an imperative for survival. DevOps has become this imperative, and CIOs must engender a culture of collaboration and learning and enable their people with the right tools to drive holistic life-cycle automation.  

 

Lean processes are critical to success

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Collaborate With Finance To Prove Marketing's Business Value

The Data Digest: The Information Power Play

Anjali Lai

Recent incidents remind us that knowledge is power. Earlier this week, US President Trump shared classified information with foreign delegates — and by doing so, he potentially declassified it. When The Washington Post exposed the headline first, the article became the most viewed digital news story in the publication’s history. This comes only a few days after a sweep of global cyberattacks locked major corporations and governments out of their data and threatened to release stolen content (like a soon-to-be-released Disney film) in increments. These stories remind us that those who own and control information wield power — but also that the boundary between public and private information is becoming easier to transgress.  

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Congrats On Your New Car! But Before You Go . . .

Danielle Travaglini
If you’ve ever bought a car from an auto dealership, this story might ring true for you.
 
After weeks of test driving, researching, and debating prices, I finally settled on the exact car to buy. I felt relieved to make this decision and couldn’t wait to drive my new ride home.
 
But there was just one thing left to do: meet with the dealership’s “finance guy” to finalize everything. What should have been a quick and painless interaction with a dealership employee turned out to be uncomfortable and maddening. The employee was extremely pushy, attempting to use scare tactics to sell me additional warranties and insurance. I politely declined these numerous times, only to have my repeated “no, thanks” ignored and refuted with condescending comments. After begging over and over to simply sign my paperwork so I could leave, I managed to extract myself from this employee’s grip, feeling exhausted, annoyed, and disrespected to the point where I wondered why I was buying a car from these people in the first place. I was no longer excited and just wanted to leave and never come back. Not exactly a fairy tale ending to my car-buying experience. 
 
I’m not alone in feeling this way; one customer in Forrester’s Customer Experience Index (CX Index™) Consumer Perspective Online Community says of her car-buying experience:
 
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B2B Marketers Need To Apply The Lessons Of Customer Obsession To Seller Development

Steven Wright

“We need to train the sales force!” comes the cry. Whether marketing or product management, sales ops or finance, IT or legal, everyone wants to train the sales force. The reasons are always good: efficiency, effectiveness, and excellence. But frequent and tactical training can distract sellers from and delay them in performing their most important task: selling.

My newest report, "Build A Seller Development Framework," updates Forrester’s Seller Development Framework (formerly Forrester’s Sales Training Solution Framework) to take a fresh look at how to plan for and evaluate the training needs of sellers to move beyond defining needs based on "Who's asking?" to "What’s the right approach?"

Sales enablement vendors have also taken note of the need to embed seller development within sales enablement automation. Brainshark has announced partnerships with Highspot and Seismic to leverage Brainshark’s solutions for sales mastery and continuous training as part of overall sales enablement automation. Allego, a mobile video sales learning platform, just announced a partnership with Wilson Learning to provide more continuous sales development. These announcements are in line with our predictions of increased partnering in the sales enablement and development market.

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Product Development Must Evolve for the Internet of Things

Nate Fleming

Traditional physical products and machinery are steadily being replaced by connected products and assets that shift business models and augment customer relationships with digital experiences and data.  But creation of these products is a major challenge for traditional product companies. The process of building connected products is complex, requiring new software development skill sets, accelerated product release cadences, and innovative software tools and proccesses that meet the needs of IoT product organizations.  For traditional product companies to make the transition to a digital product development organization and successfully create connected products they will need to focus on the following five initiatives:

  1. Create an open partner ecosystem that amplifies product value.
  2. Organize for continuous product improvement through software updates.
  3. Adapt agile development and planning processes to physical product development.
  4. Embrace flexible requirements and contracting for iterative projects.
  5. Build an extended team of broad and deep t-shaped skillsets.

Adaptation and execution on these initiatives will be difficult requiring executive buy in, core shifts to company cultures, partnership with services firms, reskilling, and change management initiatives.  For a deeper dive on this topic and actionable steps to take in the transformation to a digital product development organization, see the Forrester report The Internet Of Things Propels Product Development Into The Digital Era.

IBM to retire Emptoris and work with SAP Ariba on next generation digital procurement

Duncan Jones

SAP Ariba & IBM today announced a partnership that had been a rumour for a few days now. Part of the deal includes IBM gradually retiring Emptoris and encouraging its customers to migrate to SAP Ariba.

http://www.ariba.com/about/press-releases/sap-ariba-and-ibm-transform-procurement

It’s an ambitious move by SAP Ariba. IBM Emptoris’s leadership had an exciting vision of next gen digital procurement but decided they couldn’t deliver it without a cost prohibitive replatforming of its various products. SAP Ariba has a good suite of products and a captive market, but now its leaders have shown that they also have a vision for digital procurement. The partnership makes sense for both companies.

·         IBM can now convert its digital procurement vision into revenue streams. By linking up with SAP Ariba it will be able to create a royalty stream for IBM Watson and implementation work for IBM GBS. Gracefully retiring Emptoris is a pragmatic decision and avoids wasting money trying to shore up a revenue stream that was doomed to decline anyway.

·         SAP Ariba will benefit from IBM’s vision, technology, and influence. It will get some new ideas about the opportunities for digital procurement. IBM GBS’s procurement transformation practice will become a source of leads for SAP Ariba. IBM’s own procurement department may be a proving ground for its innovation, (assuming that it eventually migrates from Emptoris to the Watson-enhanced SAP Ariba platform).

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Five Factors That Make Deep Learning Different - Go Deep Baby!

Mike Gualtieri

At the highest conceptual level, deep learning is no different from supervised machine learning. Data scientists start with a labeled data set to train a model using an algorithm and, hopefully, end up with a model that is accurate enough at predicting the labels of new data that is run through the model. For example, developers can use Caffe, a popular deep-learning library, to train a model using thousands or millions of labeled images. Once they train the model, developers can use it within applications to probabilistically identify objects in a new image.  Conceptually like machine learning, yes, but deep learning is different because:

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C-Level Business Executives Are Playing A Bigger Role In Tech Spending, But CIOs Still Remain Dominant

Andrew Bartels

Tech buying in business and governments is clearly shifting from the sole or primary control of the CIO and the tech management organization and into the hands of business leaders.  But how much is this happening? Anecdotal comments and surveys – including Forrester’s own Business Technographics surveys – suggest that most tech purchases are now controlled by business executives.  However, in our just-published report, “C-Suite Tech Purchasing Patterns,” Forrester’s analysis shows that the shift of tech buying from the CIO to business executives is much less dramatic, with just 5% of all new tech purchases fully controlled by business by 2018.  Moreover, this shift varies dramatically by C-level executive. CMOs and eCommerce heads have the highest proportion of new project spending under their control, but CFOs, COOs, supply chain heads, and heads of customer service are much less likely to go it on their own.

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Data is the perimeter, defend it that way

Chase Cunningham

Data is the perimeter, defend it that way

Unless you have been living under a rock or possibly hiding in the mountains of Montana with a giant beard and eating way too many government issued MRE’s you probably heard about the nuclear bomb of a ransomware attack that kicked off last week.  Welcome to the post apocalypse folks.  For years, many of us in the cybersecurity industry have been jumping up and down on desks and trying to get the world (writ large) to pay attention to managing and patching outdated systems and operating systems that have been running legacy software, to no avail.  Now that Pandora’s box has been opened and the bad guys have use the NSA leaked tools as weapons platforms all the sudden everyone gives a dang.  I caught no less than 17 talking heads on the news this morning stating that “this is the new reality”, and “cybercrime is a serious threat to our way of life.”  Duh, also water is wet and fire is hot.  Thank you news.  

Regardless of all the bad that is bouncing around the news and everywhere else today (and as I type this I can literally see a pew pew map on CNN that looks like a Zika Virus map showing the spread of WannaCry dominating the screen behind the anchor team) the reality around this “massive hack” and “global attack” is that if folks didn’t suck at patching their systems and followed basic best practices instead of crossing their fingers and hoping that they didn’t get hit the “end of days malware” would be basically ineffective.  The “hack” targets Windows XP systems, an old, outdated, unsupported OS that should have been pulled from use eons ago.  And if the legacy system running that OS couldn’t be pulled, IT SHOULD HAVE AT LEAST BEEN PATCHED.  Problem solved, or at least made manageable. 

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