The State Of Mobile Marketer Tactics 2017

Thomas Husson

I just published a new report to help marketers benchmark the mobile tactics and technologies their B2C marketer peers use and are planning to use in the next 12 months. The key findings are as below:

  • Marketers Misuse Mobile Marketing Tactics

B2C marketers often focus too much on piloting the latest mobile shiny object (see graphic below); unfortunately, they fail to adequately invest in the core mobile touchpoints — like email or search — that most consumers use to engage with brands.

  • Use Mobile To Transform Brand Experiences

Too few marketers think of mobile as an opportunity to transform the brand experience. To truly differentiate themselves, marketers should develop mobile-unique interactions delivering visible value with apps, messaging, and online-to offline tactics.

  • Insights And Constant Optimization Are Key To Unlocking Mobile’s Full Potential

To rethink how mobile could transform the customer journey, marketers should use ethnographic research and journey maps to develop a more holistic vision of their customer behaviors that leverage contextual data. Testing and learning will not be enough — the use of optimization techniques must be systematic.

Clients willing to know more can access the full report here.

Cloudera IPO Highlights The Big Data And Hadoop Opportunity

Jennifer Adams

Last week, Cloudera successfully completed an IPO, raising $259 million of equity capital, including the over-allotment option. Shares were priced at $15 per share and traded up to over $18 per share on the first day of trading, giving investors a 20%+ return.

Cloudera describes itself as a company that “empowers organizations to become data‑driven enterprises in the newly hyperconnected world.” Cloudera, founded in 2008, was the first commercial Hadoop player and is a Leader in Mike Gualtieri and Noel Yuhanna’s The Forrester Wave™: Big Data Hadoop Distributions, Q1 2016.

Last August, Forrester published its first Big Data Management Solutions Forecast, 2016 To 2021 (Global). In our forecast, we highlighted Hadoop as the fastest-growing sector, at a 32.9% CAGR over the 2016 to 2021 period. We estimate that firms will spend nearly $800 million on Hadoop and Hadoop-related services in 2017 and that this will grow to $2.3 billion by 2021.

In its S-1 filing, Cloudera reported revenues of $109 million, $166 million, and $261 million in the years ending January 31, 2015, 2016, and 2017, respectively. This represents 52% year-over-year growth in 2016, accelerating to 57% year-over-year growth in 2017. Cloudera’s customer base is primarily Global 8000 companies, accounting for 73% of revenues.

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Facebook Knows Your Emotions, So What?

James McQuivey

A minor ruckus ensued this week when major media reported that Facebook knows how its users feel. It appears that some believe that the world is therefore coming to a nefarious end. As in, "Lions, and tigers, and emotions, Oh my!"

The specific incident involved an analysis that some of Facebook's team undertook in Australia, the results of which were shared in a private conversation with a potential advertiser down under. The reaction of the major media and many voices online was to immediately panic. The objections were straightforward: a) Facebook is snooping into people's lives and learning things it ought not (in this case, insecure teenagers, which seems all the more troublesome), b) Facebook wants to sell this ill-gotten knowledge to advertisers, and c) Facebook and advertisers are in colusion to commit some kind of terrible maniuplation of humanity.

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In the war for talent, traditional enterprises must pick fights they can win

Paul Miller

19th century chemical plant in Scotland

(St. Rollox Chemical Works in Scotland by D.O. Hill, 1831. Image source: Wikipedia)

The world of work is changing, with my colleague JP Gownder among those doing a great job tracking the shift.

Despite — or perhaps because of — digitisation, robots, globalisation (and its opposite), and a less loyal workforce, competition for digital talent is high. The darlings of Silicon Valley slug it out, paying ever-higher salaries and offering ever-more excessive perks, in desperate bids to grab talent from one competitor. And then they engage in an even more desperate bid to dissuade them from jumping ship when the next offer comes in.

Spare a thought, then, for the poor traditional enterprise. It needs pretty much the same digital talent. But it can rarely afford the same rapidly inflating salaries. It is unlikely to have as cool a brand. A cubicle and a dress code is — unfairly — assumed to be more likely than an in-house chef or stock options.

And yet, in some recent research I did, these staid, lumbering, stuffy giants of yesteryear are putting up a great fight… and often winning.

There’s plenty they — and you — can do. There’s plenty they are doing. And a lot of it comes down to challenging the assumption that every great digitally savvy employee wants to live their life at a Valley startup. That’s simply not true.

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The Data Digest: Youth’s Scattered Social Mobile Behaviors

Reineke Reitsma

Recently, I was on a road trip in Morocco with my family, including three teenagers. While my interest in their phone usage at home mostly concentrates on the amount of time they spend on their devices, during the trip I got firsthand insight into how they use their phones. All three of them used it as a lifeline to their friends at home in the Netherlands, but it was amazing to see how each of them does that in a totally different way. My 16-year-old son was primarily “apping” (texting using Whatsapp) with his friends and sending the occasional picture; my 14-year-old daughter was trying to keep her Snapchat “streaks” alive while dealing with bad Wi-Fi signals and long road trips; while my 12-year-old daughter was vlogging all day about everything she encountered and uploading the videos when we had a signal. Part of these differences in behavior can be explained by their characters, but it’s mostly the result of the two-year age gaps between them. Even though they are all in their teens, they grew up with different digital platforms and capabilities.

The Forrester Data Consumer Technographics North American Youth Survey, 2017 (US), also shows this. More than half of US youth use YouTube, Instagram, Snapchat, and Facebook daily. But when we dive a level deeper, we see that the 14 and 15 year olds are more likely to post online than their 16- and 17-year-old peers.

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Zero Trust for MeatWare: It Applies to Us Humans Too

Chase Cunningham

Zero Trust principles have, thus far, been mainly aimed at the network and the technology that makes our interconnected systems “live.” That’s how the concept was originally meant to be applied, but the reality of the threat vectors and need for better security capabilities means that Zero Trust has to adapt just like everything else does. The concept for Zero Trust is super, and it's being adopted at quite a few major organizations, but there's still a problem:

 

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Back To Basics: How The Most Improved US Auto Insurers Mastered The Mobile Customer Experience

Ellen Carney

The results are in!  Along with my fellow researchers August Du Pont, Mike Chirokas, I  just completed our yearly review of the mobile features offered by leading US auto insurers.[i]   In our fourth year of assessing these essential portable features, these 13 auto insurers achieved an impressive average score of 75 out of 100, seven points higher than our 2015 benchmark, even as we raised the bar in terms of our expected performance of these mobile auto insurance features. 

What were the key takeaways from this year’s study?

  • Geico again leads; Allstate squeezes past USAA by a nose.  With a nearly perfect score of 96 out of 100, Geico retained its lead among the 13 US auto insurers we evaluated. Allstate’s strong mobile capabilities moved it up into second place, a nostril ahead of USAA.
  • Many digital teams have made big improvements.  Nationwide, The Hartford, Esurance, State Farm, and American Family all improved their mobile services substantially.  Leading digital insurance teams are creating more personalized and simplified experiences, and they are providing more guidance to their customers on how to make the most of digital features.
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Accelerate Your Digital Momentum At Forrester’s Digital Transformation Mumbai 2017

Ashutosh Sharma

Forrester’s annual flagship India event Digital Transformation Mumbai 2017 is almost here. This exclusive event has grown over the years to become one of the most anticipated events for India’s senior business leaders.

At last year’s event, we presented the right operating model for organizations to support their digital transformations: the customer-obsessed operating model. Our audience let us know the model resonated because it is easy to understand and business leaders could relate it to their day-to-day activities. More importantly, it challenged their thinking about what digital transformation in the age of the customer should be: It’s not about reducing costs or improving operational efficiency, but about driving customer obsession.

In 2017, we plan to take that thinking further. We will talk about the role of digital operational excellence (DOX) in delivering great customer experiences (CX). We have researched quite a few companies that are hiring senior leaders to head their digital projects or CX initiatives who grasp the value of great CX in winning, serving, and retaining customers. However, our research shows that the activities that go on below the line of visibility are not well understood in terms of their importance to delivering great CX. This area is where DOX lives.

This event will present Forrester’s thought leadership on how enterprises need to focus on both digital CX and DOX as they embark upon their digital transformations. In addition, we will highlight the most common blind spots firms encounter and outline the “how-to” of digital transformation with great industry examples.

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Netflix Hack: Key Lessons In The Economics Of Ransomware And Managing Third-Party Risk

Renee Murphy

Netflix recently experienced a third-party breach. The data lost is Season 5 of Orange is the New Black, which is original Netflix content. Many are calling it the largest entertainment industry hack since Sony. I guess that is right, but how bad is it really?

First, here is what happened. Netflix transferred season five to their post-production third party in Los Angeles, Larson Studios, for sound mixing and editing. Larson does the post work for at least 25 episodics that run on Fox, ABC, IFC and Netflix. It was Larson Studios that was hacked and, according to thedarkoverlord (TDO), they made off with not just Netflix content but network content as well, putting at risk the release of Documentary Now, Portlandia, Fargo and many others.  TDO contacted Netflix and asked for a bitcoin ransom or it would dump their content for download. Netflix refused to be extorted and TDO made good on its threat.

That got me thinking…was Netflix right to not pay the ransom? What was the real impact of that decision? Can networks and studios do the same thing? Are they inoculated from third party damage because of their industry or their product? Let’s find out.

1.     Was Netflix right to not pay the ransom? Yes. If I have learned anything from the state department it’s that we don't negotiate with terrorists. For Netflix, there is no reason to overreact or go to great lengths to explain the impacts. If you do an impact analysis, you see that it has a medium reputational risk, a low financial risk and no regulatory risk. With that kind of risk analysis, you don’t pay a ransom.

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The Power of Best Practices and Next Practices

Victor Milligan

Most companies have accepted the new market reality: customers are in charge, having digital chops is table stakes, and disruption is becoming normal. 

Although most companies have accepted this reality, they also admit that they are not prepared for it. In our Customer Obsessed Assessment, 62% of companies identified as being behind the power curve addressing current customer demands and an additional 25% are slightly behind where they want to be.

The results are not terribly shocking; there’s a lot of work to do. But it doesn’t make it any less scary once you realize we’re in the early stages of change.

The large-scale market response is still playing out - and the cycle of far-reaching (and sometimes painful) change will be playing out for many years to come. Arguably the large-scale market response is still to come. For example:

  • We have seen early examples of digital disruption in select industries, but have not seen the impact of digital platforms fronted by virtual agents creating havoc for brands to retain or improve their relationship with customers. 
  • We have not seen the impact of industrial platforms reshaping manufacturing processes and unleashing the power of data to the strategic advantage to some – and to the strategic threat to others. 
  • We have not seen the global market impact if CMOs shift major chunks of budget to digital experiences and away from advertising, squeezing the agency market.
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