You just found out you’re a loyalty laggard. Now what?

Emily Collins

Blogged in collaboration with Samantha Ngo, Senior Research Associate, serving Customer Insights professionals.

After taking the customer loyalty assessment, you know whether you’re a laggard, learner, leader, or legend:

Great, but you’re probably thinking "Where do we go from here?" You need a game plan that clearly identifies where and how improvements should be made. To do so, take the gaps in your current approach and prioritize your tasks based on whether each one is a:

  • Need to have. These are non-negotiable tasks that will make or break your graduation to the next maturity level.
  • Want to have. These are important, but not critical tasks for taking your maturity to the next level.
  • Nice to have. These tasks come in handy for differentiating your loyalty approach, but have little bearing on your maturity level.

Priorities will differ for each stage of loyalty maturity and I lay out examples of these needs, wants, and nice to haves in my recent report, Craft A Customer Loyalty Strategy That Raises Your Maturity. Do you have a plan?

Taking Loyalty Beyond The Program

Emily Collins

I really enjoyed sharing insights about loyalty in the Age of the Customer at Forrester's Customer Experience Forum East back in June. I got some great questions from the audience about how to start planning and advancing their loyalty strategy. Next up, I'll be continuing the conversations at Forrester's Customer Experience Forum West in Anaheim, CA, November 6-7. And, a few weeks later I'll also be at our EMEA Customer Experience Forum, November 17-18 in London. Here's a sneak peek of the content I'll be sharing at my track session. I hope to see you there!

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Chinese Businesses Embrace Social Intelligence

Gene Cao

Chinese people are hypersocial in their lifestyle and daily work, and Forrester forecasts that 681 million of them will be using social media by 2019. Online Chinese are actively engaging with brands and companies on social media: 29 brands or companies on Sina Weibo and 32 brands or companies on WeChat on average. Chinese businesses have realized the importance of social for customer life-cycle management. While they’ve started using social to increase brand awareness — such as broadcasting on Sina Weibo — they can’t recognize potential customers in this one-way communication. They use public WeChat accounts to shorten response times to client service requests — but they can’t predict these requests in advance. To address these challenges, businesses in China are starting to use enterprise-class analytics tools for Chinese social platforms.

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How do you measure customer loyalty? Let me count the ways.

Emily Collins

mixed up measure

I recently interviewed a number of companies about their approach to customer loyalty. In each conversation I asked a variation of the question "How do you define and measure customer loyalty?" And what struck me is that while many companies define loyalty using various terms like share of wallet, length of relationship, engagement, and customer value, they often measure it using only transactional metrics. Now, there are various reasons for this. Some don't have access they to the data they need to gage emotional loyalty. Others don't have the analytics capabilities or resources they need to pull the pieces together. But loyalty if multi-faceted, complex, and has emotional and rational aspects that aren't mutually exclusive, and certainly can't be reduced to a single metric.

So what should you do? First, heed my rallying cry: It's time to push past purchase as a proxy for loyalty. Second, Forrester can help. Loyalty may be difficult to measure, but it's not impossible. My latest research report provides a framework that buckets loyalty measurement into four, cooperative levels:

  • Programmatic measurement assesses loyalty program health. These metrics explain how the loyalty program grows in size, scope, and activity level over time. Sample metrics include enrollment rates, offer response rates, and program usage.
  • Purchase measurement quantifies the customer relationship. These metrics explain how the loyalty strategy improves customer profitability. Sample metrics include average order value, frequency, and basket assortment.
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Extended Google Analytics Benchmark Capabilities Threaten To Disrupt

James McCormick

Blogged in collaboration with Samantha Ngo, Senior Research Associate, serving Customer Insights professionals.

You’ve heard us saying a thousand times: the buzz about big data isn’t about the amount of data you’ve collected; it’s how you digest that data and turn it into actionable insights. With the revamp to Google Analytics’ (GAs) benchmarking, Google is taking the next steps in allowing us common folk to process data in a platform with a simple UI, built to enable you to draw insights to catalyze actionable improvements to your marketing program.

Google’s vision is there. GAs extended benchmarking capability  – available to free and premium users - offers some sparkly new features such as 1600 industry categories (previously 26), size buckets, and location filters that allow for basic segmentation; and, the tool can automatically place you within one of these categories according to your web traffic, etc. Also, you have to give to get: Opting out of allowing Google to collect your information anonymously means you won’t have access to benchmarking features. Given GA’s huge deployment footprint — we’re talking about big time big data and a great opportunity for firms of all sizes and verticals to compare themselves to relevant markets.

But as you excitedly dive into Google’s benchmarking big data lake you should consider that;

  • This isn’t quite ready for enterprise. For the moment the benchmarks can only be viewed via Google reports; and digital marketers will not be able to suck this benchmark data (via APIs etc..) into their favourite dashboarding or BI tool.
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Just Published: The Forrester Wave--Cross-Channel Campaign Management, Q3 2014

Jason McNellis

I cut my teeth as a data analyst helping brands communicate more effectively—building segmentation and targeting models that differentiated contact frequency, offers, and messaging across a brand’s customer base. But in the face of today’s more empowered customers building static scoring models and relying on batch-based campaigns is insufficient to win, serve and retain customers. Today most enterprises rely heavily on technology to help them interact with customers across channels, and as we evaluated in the newly published Forrester Wave: Cross Channel Campaign Management, Q3 2014, brands have several compelling choices.  

We identified, researched, and scored solutions from nine vendors: Adobe, IBM, Infor, Pitney Bowes, RedPoint Global, SAP, SAS Institute, SDL, and Teradata. Our approach consisted of a 41-criteria evaluation; reference calls and online surveys of 96 companies; executive briefings; and product demonstrations.

We identified four leaders in this mature, but evolving category. What sets leaders apart?

  • Depth of cross-channel capabilities. Leaders consistently received high scores in cross-channel data integration capabilities, which includes cross-channel customer identification and centralized response history management. But the purpose of collecting this data is so marketers can make smarter—more customer obsessed—decisions. Not surprisingly then, leaders also receive high marks in areas of interaction management such as cross-channel decision management and real-time analytics.  
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Ease Your Selection Of Customer Analytics Providers In China

Gene Cao

Forrester surveys in China show that business data and analytics are increasing as the No. 1 technology priority for Chinese businesses; 55% of technology decision-makers in the country plan to use data and analytics to improve business decisions and outcomes in 2014, up from 43% in 2013. Chinese digital marketers are looking for powerful tools to better understand customer behavior, especially regarding customer acquisition. Businesses in industries like banking and financial services, telecommunications, and retail understand that data and analytics are critical for enabling business transformation — but they have struggled with a lack of data and analytics tools in the market.

The supply side of the Chinese customer analytics market is fragmented and includes a confusing mix of global and local providers. Most customer analytics solution providers started doing business in China in the early 2000s, when the country became much more open to foreign capital. Companies like Procter & Gamble and Coca-Cola introduced new marketing concepts and became the first to use customer analytics solutions in China. To serve these global companies, leading analytics vendors like FICO, IBM, Oracle, and SAS successfully built up their analytics businesses and extended them into local Chinese markets. Increasing demand for analytics also compelled local vendors like Alibaba and Baidu to start providing customer analytics solutions in China. My latest report, “The Customer Analytics Market in China,” profiles these customer analytics providers in four categories to ease your decision-making on vendor selection.

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Customer Experience Q&A With Carl Mogridge, Head of Digital, Australia & New Zealand, Avon Products, Inc.

Michael Barnes

For many organizations, the digital journey is full of potential roadblocks. Successful organizations excel at overcoming traditional operational practices, approaches, and mindsets to enable change.

For a well-known global brand like Avon, embracing an omnichannel approach to customer engagement was essential to continue thriving in a digital world. We’re therefore pleased to have Carl Mogridge speak at Forrester’s Summit For Marketing & Strategy Professionals: Australia. Carl is head of digital at Avon Products, leading the company’s initiatives to implement systematic, measurable change on the path to digital disruption.

Carl was kind enough to answer a few of our questions about what he’s doing. Those of you who’ll be with us in Sydney this Wednesday, August 13, can hear even more from Carl. I hope to see you there!

Q: When did your company first begin focusing on the customer experience? Why?

Avon is 127 years old and from day one we’ve focused on creating customer-centric conversations based on personalized service and innovative products. At Avon, we want to be helpful, safe, and reliable to our customers — so our entire customer experience strategy revolves around these simple criteria.

Q: How do you determine which aspects of the customer experience you must try to excel at?

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When a Dilemma Becomes a Polylemma

Rusty Warner

In the age of the customer, customer insights (CI) professionals must invest in software solutions that will help them orchestrate contextual marketing.  However, as outlined in Cory Munchbach’s report Let’s Revisit the Enterprise Marketing Technology Landscape (Again), the market is in a state of flux.  Not only are we seeing tremendous M&A activity, but a constant stream of new vendors is flooding an already crowded space with innovative solutions. 

How does the CI pro responsible for marketing technology buying make an informed decision when faced with so many options?  Well, to quote Ron Davies (feel free to summon the voices of Three Dog Night, David Bowie or Shelby Lynne, if you prefer), “It Ain’t Easy!”  To help CI pros with their decision-making, my latest brief The Marketing Technology Buyer’s Dilemma provides advice on how to maintain customer focus while navigating market changes.

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Customer Experience Q&A With Louise Long, Head of Customer Experience, NAB

Michael Barnes

As customers we’re rarely satisfied with simply buying goods and services. What we really want, on top of the actual purchase, is a great customer experience (CX). This drives us to seek out companies that not only understand our wants and desires but more importantly, understand the role their company’s products actually play in our lives.

Nowhere is this more true than in the hyper-competitive Australian retail banking market. That’s why we invited Louise Long to speak at Forrester’s Summit For Marketing & Strategy Professionals: Australia. Louise is Head of Customer Experience at National Australia Bank (NAB), leading the company’s initiatives to deliver truly great customer experiences to NAB’s clients.

Louise was kind enough to answer a few of our questions about what she’s doing. Read on for insight into how NAB continuously seeks innovative ways to ensure that the customer remains at the center of the company’s business strategy.

Those of you who’ll be with us in Sydney on Wednesday, August 13th, can hear even more from Louise. I look forward to seeing you there!

Q: When did your company first begin focusing on customer experience? Why?

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