Real-World Feedback on Real-Time Interaction Management

Rusty Warner

Have you ever felt like this…

Our vendor has some great capabilities that we are not leveraging, but I would place the blame on us.

Well, you’re not alone. That’s actually a direct quote from one of the 74 customer references we surveyed for the Forrester Wave™: Real-Time Interaction Management, Q3 2015. In general, we found that most customers are deploying real-time capabilities across only a few channels today. The most prevalent real-time interaction management (RTIM) use cases? Web personalization and dynamic email content are well ahead of other deployments, in use by 62% and 60% of survey respondents, respectively.  Decision management for contact centers and eCommerce recommendations are next in line, but the former may not be connected to digital channels, and the latter may leverage its own set of tools. Real-time mobile app deployments are surprisingly few – 8th in our list of digital and off-line channels – but by far the highest number of respondents (49%) plan to add mobile capabilities.

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...Where Angels Fear To Tread

Rusty Warner

We all know the opening part of Pope’s often-quoted adage. Certainly some acquisitions in the enterprise marketing technology arena are now looking like foolish decisions. In yesterday’s 2015 trading update, SDL announced it will sell multiple products that are “non-core to its future strategy,” including social intelligence, campaign management, and its Fredhopper eCommerce recommendation engine. SDL paid $110 million for the first two solutions when it completed its acquisition of Alterian in early 2012. The SDL announcement echoes Teradata’s similar announcement in November to sell its marketing application division. Teradata acquired Aprimo in late 2010 for $525 million, and then added smaller acquisitions of eCircle, Argyle Social, Ozone, Apoxxee, and FLXone – the last pick-up coming less than one month before the sell-off announcement.

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The US Holiday Shopping Season 2015 Sets New Online Records And Rebrands Black Friday

Kristopher Arcand

With the winter shopping holidays now behind us, Forrester is wrapping up its annual qualitative exploration of US consumers’ perceptions of the holiday season, both for their own behavior as well as what they observed across retailers. The retail industry has seen an increase in consumer spending compared to last year — possibly due to savings from lower gas prices. Overall, we saw that consumers felt less compelled to go out and buy gifts on Black Friday itself, but they still love a good bargain. Some other insights we gathered:

  • Black Friday sales effectively crossed over from in-store to online. While in-store shopping dropped on Black Friday, online shopping sales rose, resulting in an overall increase in sales. Consumers were quite conscious of the fact that online deals appeared even before the Thanksgiving holiday (and therefore before Black Friday). This year, these sales also carried the “Black Friday” label — traditionally an in-store-specific event. By re-associating Black Friday with deals first and foremost, this could restore positive sentiment and downplay what has otherwise become a stressful shopping event.
  • Targeted outreach drives online sales — but retailers shouldn’t overdo it. A smaller number of targeted deals and offers will help reduce the overall volume of email that consumers receive. This will in turn minimize the chances of consumer recipients being overwhelmed by holiday communications.
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Just published -- The Forrester Wave: Customer Loyalty Solutions For Large And Midsize Organizations, Q1 2016

Emily Collins

I recently wrapped up my third evaluation of customer loyalty vendors, and the market has evolved slightly since 2013. First, the lines between loyalty technology and services are fading: vendors that were traditionally considered service providers continue to productize and improve their technology platforms, and pure-play loyalty technology platform providers are shoring up their professional services offerings. Second, on the user side, I talk to clients who are looking for more holistic solutions and including a combination of service providers, agencies, and software-as-a-service (SaaS) technology platforms in the same request for proposal (RFP).

Given the hybridization of the market and evolving customer demands, we took a slightly different approach and conducted two evaluations of end-to-end loyalty solutions: one for large organizations including Aimia, Bond Brand Loyalty (formerly Maritz Loyalty Marketing), Brierley+Partners, Comarch, Epsilon, ICF Olson 1to1, Kobie Marketing, and TIBCO Software; and one for midsize organizations including 500friends, a Merkle company; Aimia; Clutch; CrowdTwist; DataCandy; Deluxe Corporation; and Inte Q Global.

What did we learn?

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Understanding "Creepiness"

Fatemeh Khatibloo

We've all felt it: a weird sense that information about you has been used in a way that just doesn't feel right.

Maybe you received a kids apparel catalog at your decidedly DINK home. Or maybe you saw an online ad at home for a product you'd been looking at from your work computer earlier that day. Or, perhaps your mobile device pinged when you walked into a store to tell you about specials for that store - even though your location settings were turned off.

Many of us in the privacy world have a strong dislike of the word "creepy" because it can't be quantified. And, practically-speaking, it's rather useless because what's "creepy" to one person might well be "useful" to another.

I'm working on research to quantify what we mean when we say something is "creepy," and to categorize the types of incidents that cause people to feel it. That means I need examples - lots of them. And I need your help.

If you've had a creepy marketing, advertising, or customer service experience, won't you please take a moment to tell us about it?

We've set up a short 8-question survey that you can complete anonymously, if you prefer. Your contribution will help us understand how we experience creepiness, and help us educate companies about how not to be creepy!

Forrester’s 2016 Predictions: All That Data Will Finally Drive Business Action

Carlton Doty

Do you consider yourself “data-driven”? If you’re like most business and technology leaders, you do. But the reality is that most businesses have only scratched the surface when it comes to transforming all of that data into insight that drives real business action. In our 2016 predictions report, my colleagues Brian Hopkins, Jennifer Belissent, PhD., and I predict what will happen in the hottest areas of big data, analytics, business intelligence, and systems of insight — and tell you what to do about it. Here’s a sneak at just a few highlights:

  • Chief data officers (CDOs) will gain power, prestige, and presence . . . for now. The trend toward appointing a CDO accelerated in 2015, and will continue in 2016.  CI pros should take advantage of this. How? Extend customer insights beyond marketing to drive a culture of insights-to-execution across the organization.
     
  • Firms will try to come to terms with data science scarcity. Two-thirds of firms will have built predictive systems capability by mid-2016, but will struggle to find data science talent. Customer insights teams must increase analytic yield without waiting for hard-to-find data scientists. How? Some analytics platforms from vendors like AgilOne, Custora, and Origami Logic can empower business users without a rigorous statistical background.
     
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Neustar Acquires MarketShare To Close The Data to Insights Gap

Tina Moffett

Last Thursday, marketing data and analytics company, Neustar, agreed to acquire marketing analytics technology provider MarketShare Partners, for $450 million.  Neustar is an information services company, providing everything from complex registry management to deliver marketing insights. MarketShare Partners provides advanced analytics technology to help c-level executives improve marketing’s impact on revenue.    

The Neustar acquisition of MarketShare means:

A powerful insights engine will come to market.  The Neustar acquisition of MarketShare for $450 million indicates one thing:data is not enough. Neustar needed to expand on its existing data, marketing, and identity solutions and add an analytics technology layer to help CMOs measure, analyze, and optimize marketing initiatives.  The acquistion of MarketShare helps Neustar clients bring all that rich data to life, and will give MarketShare clients access to even more customer based data to enhance its current analytics.

Neustar to gain more access to CMOs .  Neustar’s primary stakeholders sit right below the c-suite. This acquisition will  hopefully change that; MarketShare’s strong experience  as a  trusted advisor Fortune 1000 to clients such as USAA, Hilton, and Neiman Marcus.  MarketShare has a proven track record of guiding executives through marketing planning decisions, changes in prices, and change management decisions.  This acquisition will potentially give Neustar more credibility with C-level executives, if they can speak their language.

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Get Your Privacy House In Order, or 2016 Will Hit Your Business Hard

Fatemeh Khatibloo

Now that we’re firmly settled in the Age of the Customer, it’s time to take stock of the factors that are really going to drive business success -- or failure -- over the next few years. At Forrester, we’re betting our hats that privacy will be one a big one. In fact, we think that privacy is integral to each one of the 10 success factors in 2016.

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Privacy & Personalization: two globally important initiatives, one tremendous opportunity

Fatemeh Khatibloo

I'm just back from two weeks in Hong Kong, where I'd been invited to give a keynote at the 10th anniversary conference of the Business Information Industry Association. Since I was there, I took the time to meet with some fantastic Forrester clients in industries ranging from travel to insurance to retail to consulting. In nearly every discussion, whether I was speaking to a BT or a marketing exec, we eventually got to the topic of the "privacy-personalization paradox."

This is an issue I've explored extensively, and have written about before. It's a challenge that marketers in the US dabble with when they're considering investments in tools like retail beacons and cross-device identity resolution. But it was enlightening to hear about the challenges that firms in APAC face: antiquated privacy laws, a dearth of third-party consumer data, and even the incredible difficulty of compiling a single customer view across their own first party data. Interestingly, though, the solution in both markets is similar: preference management

I've just published a report about enterprise preference management, which Forrester defines as:

The business practice of systematically collecting, managing, and utilizing explicit customer preferences — about frequency, channel, content, interests, and intent — in outbound communications.

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The Enterprise Marketing Technology Landscape - Simplified

Rusty Warner

We’ve all seen comprehensive diagrams featuring hundreds of vendor logos across multiple marketing technology categories. So, when tasked with mapping the technologies required to deliver contextual marketing, I decided to simplify things. For more details, see my new report “Combine Systems Of Insight And Engagement For Contextual Marketing.”

Forrester has defined broad “systems of X” categories that include systems of record, design, operation/automation, insight, and engagement. The latter two lend themselves to the enterprise marketing technology landscape.

Real-time analytics and insights drive the contextual marketing engine (below), and these tools fit squarely into the systems of insight category. Customer data bases and big data repositories fuel the engine, and as customer behavior refreshes them frequently, they, too, are systems of insight (as opposed to more static systems of record).

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